TRAFFIC ADVISORY:

President Trump is scheduled to be in Philadelphia on Tuesday, September 15, 2020 at The National Constitution Center (NCC) in the Independence Mall area. Increased police presence is anticipated in Center City throughout Tuesday afternoon and evening. Please allow extra time if you are going to Wills Eye. Please be advised of area street closures to vehicles beginning at 1:00PM on Tuesday 9/15. Pedestrian access will also be limited in the area. This is subject to change and area restrictions, which could widen, will be lifted once the President departs the NCC. There are also demonstrations planned for Tuesday 9/15 around Independence Mall as well as City Avenue.

Diabetic Retinopathy Types

Non-Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy is the earlier stage and is characterized by visible damage to small retinal blood vessels. These blood vessels may develop balloon-like swelling called microaneurysms. Microaneurysms and other areas of abnormal retinal blood vessels may leak fluid, causing the retina to swell or bleed. This may lead to vision loss. Leakage in the center of the retina (macula), known as macular edema, is the most common mechanism of vision loss in people with diabetic retinopathy. Non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy is the most common form of diabetic retinopathy, accounting for approximately 80% of all cases.

Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy

Some people progress to the more advanced proliferative diabetic retinopathy stage, which is characterized by such severe small retinal vessel damage and reduced oxygenization of the retina that the retina reacts by growing abnormal blood vessels (neovascularization). These abnormal blood vessels are fragile and can bleed and pull on the retina as they grow. Bleeding into the vitreous cavity of the eye (vitreous hemorrhage) can result in sudden and sometimes severe loss of vision. This type of hemorrhage is painless and, early one, may be seen as cobweb-like floaters in one’s vision. New floaters and any sudden vision change in a person with diabetic retinopathy should be evaluated promptly by an ophthalmologist.

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy can also lead to traction retinal detachments. The retinal neovascularization can grow to be large and then contract, pull, and lift the retina. Retinal detachment can lead to loss of vision if it involves the macula.

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FOR MORE INFORMATION ON DIABETIC RETINOPATHY OR TO SEE A RETINA SPECIALIST AT WILLS EYE HOSPITAL,
PLEASE CALL US AT 215-928-3444 OR FILL OUT OUR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT FORM.