TRAFFIC ADVISORY:

President Trump is scheduled to be in Philadelphia on Tuesday, September 15, 2020 at The National Constitution Center (NCC) in the Independence Mall area. Increased police presence is anticipated in Center City throughout Tuesday afternoon and evening. Please allow extra time if you are going to Wills Eye. Please be advised of area street closures to vehicles beginning at 1:00PM on Tuesday 9/15. Pedestrian access will also be limited in the area. This is subject to change and area restrictions, which could widen, will be lifted once the President departs the NCC. There are also demonstrations planned for Tuesday 9/15 around Independence Mall as well as City Avenue.

Intravitreal Injection

Intravitreal injections are commonly used to treat retinal diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, macular edema, and retinal vein occlusion. These diseases may cause loss of vision and should be treated as early as possible. Medications like Lucentis, Avastin, Macugen, or triamcinolone can be injected directly into the eye to help patients maintain their vision and keep loss at a minimum. Some patients may see an improvement in their vision from these injections as well, depending on the condition being treated.

Intravitreal injections are especially effective in treating wet age-related macular degeneration, which, although less common than the dry form, accounts for more than 90% of blindness caused by the disease.

This procedure is performed in your doctor's office and requires only a local anesthetic. Before the medication is injected, the eye is numbed with anesthetic eye drops to help minimize discomfort. The eye is then cleaned with an antiseptic solution. The medication is then injected directly into the eye. Intravitreal injections may be administered as frequently as once a month, depending on the condition being treated, in order to maintain eye health and optimize the vision.

Patients may experience some pain or scratchy sensations after the injection. Sometimes, patients can develop conjunctival hemorrhage (bleeding on the surface of the white of the eye), floaters, increased eye pressure and inflammation of the eye. These side effects typically resolve spontaneously or can be treated with eye drops. Other less common risks include infection, bleeding in the eye, retinal tears or detachment and cataract formation.