TRAFFIC ADVISORY:

President Trump is scheduled to be in Philadelphia on Tuesday, September 15, 2020 at The National Constitution Center (NCC) in the Independence Mall area. Increased police presence is anticipated in Center City throughout Tuesday afternoon and evening. Please allow extra time if you are going to Wills Eye. Please be advised of area street closures to vehicles beginning at 1:00PM on Tuesday 9/15. Pedestrian access will also be limited in the area. This is subject to change and area restrictions, which could widen, will be lifted once the President departs the NCC. There are also demonstrations planned for Tuesday 9/15 around Independence Mall as well as City Avenue.

Diabetic Retinopathy – Treatment

As a national leader in clinical research,
Wills Eye conducts the latest clinical trials for diabetic retinopathy.

 

 

Eye Injections for Diabetic Retinopathy

Medicines injected into the eye such as anti-VEGF drugs (eg. Lucentis, Eylea, and Avastin) and steroids (eg. Triamcinolone, Ozudex, and Iluvien) are now commonly used to treat diabetic macular edema and some of the proliferative manifestations of the condition. Both anti-VEGF and steroid medications have been proven in large-scale studies to be highly effective in reducing macular edema and improving vision.

The anti-VEGF agents are generally considered first line therapy for treating most cases. Repeat injections may be necessary for long-term control of the retinopathy.

The injections are performed in the office using topical anesthetic eye drops. They are very well tolerated and complications are rare. There is a very small risk of infection with any eye injection. Steroid injections may be associated with elevated eye pressure progression. People should discuss the risks and benefits of all treatments, including injection therapies with their eye specialist.

Request an Appointment TODAY

If you would like to speak with a Wills Eye representative for help finding a retina physician

CALL 215-928-3444

or click here to make an appointment online.

Laser

Laser photocoagulation is a well-established treatment for diabetic retinopathy. A laser delivers a split-second burst of intense light energy to treat leaky retinal blood vessels or promote shrinkage of abnormal blood vessels (neovascularization). Laser photocoagulation has been proven in large clinical trials to significantly reduced the risk of both moderate and severe vision loss in people with diabetic retinopathy.

Laser photocoagulation is performed in the office setting with the patient seated in front of the laser unit. The eye is anesthetized with drops and a contact lens may be  placed on the eye to focus the laser-aiming beam. People will experience bright flashes of lights and occasionally a pinching sensation, although many people will have no sensation of the laser at all. Some people may experience discomfort during laser photocoagulation, but generally it is a well tolerated office procedure.

 

MEET WILL EYE RETINA DOCTORS

 

JULIA A. HALLER, MD
Ophthalmologist-in-Chief

Julia A. Haller, MD - Ophthalmologist-in-Chief, Retina

CARL D. REGILLO, MD, FACS
Chief, Retina Service

Carl D. Regillo, MD, FACS, Retina, Chief

ARUNAN SIVALINGAM, MD
Co-Director, Retina Service
Director, Fellowship

Arunan Sivalingam, MD, Retina, Co-Director

DAVID H. FISCHER, MD
Co-Director, Retina Service

David H. Fischer, MD, Retina, Co-Director
Allen C. Ho, MD, Retina

ALLEN C. HO, MD
Director, Retina Research

RICHARD S. KAISER, MD
Co-Director, Retina Fellowship

SUNIR J. GARG, MD
Co-Director, Retina Research

JASON HSU, MD
Co-Director, Retina Research

Jason Hsu, MD, Retina

JAMES P. DUNN, MD
Director, Uveitis Unit

James P. Dunn, MD, Uveitis, Director

ALLEN CHIANG, MD

MICHAEL N. COHEN, MD

MITCHELL S. FINEMAN, MD

OMESH P. GUPTA, MD

M. ALI KHAN, MD

MICHAEL KLUFAS, MD

AJAY KURIYAN, MD

SONIA MEHTA, MD

Sonia Mehta, MD, Retina

CARL PARK, MD

MARC J. SPIRN, MD

Marc J. Spirn, MD, Retina

JAMES F. VANDER, MD

James F. Vander, MD, Retina

YOSHIHIRO YONEKAWA, MD

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Types of Laser Treatment

There are two main types of laser treatments in diabetic retinopathy. One is called focal laser and is a technique that has been used to treat diabetic macular edema. It is performed in one session, is generally painless, and can take up to 2 to 3 months to see any therapeutic effect. The other type of laser treatment is called panretinal (or "scatter") photocoagulation. These are longer, more extensive treatments that are used to shrink abnormal vessels in order to reduce the number or severity of vitreous hemorrhages and reduce the risk of tractional retinal detachment Panretinal laser treatments may be divided into several sessions and can be associated with some ache in the eye during or after the treatment. The desired effects may take 4 to 6 weeks or more. Both focal and panretinal laser  need to be repeated to achieve the desired treatment effect.

In general, laser treatments are intended to stabilize or prevent progression of various diabetic retinopathy complications and may or may not result in any noticeable vision improvement. The best results with the best chances of preserving a good level of vision are achieved with optimal glycemic control and early detection and treatment of diabetic retinopathy-related problems. Lastly, laser treatments may not work in everyone and other treatments (below) may be needed.

Vitrectomy

People with diabetic retinopathy may require vitrectomy surgery in an operating room setting. A vitrectomy is performed when there is bleeding or retinal traction that is causing loss of vision in people with advanced diabetic retinopathy. In this surgical procedure, small instruments are inserted into the eye under microscopic visualization, and both the vitreous hemorrhage and any scar tissue are removed. Laser photocoagulation may be performed at the time of surgery, and in some cases, a gas bubble or silicone oil may be placed to hold the retina in position if there are retinal holes or detachment. The prognosis for people who require vitrectomy surgery depends upon the status of the underlying diabetic retina.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON DIABETIC RETINOPATHY OR TO SEE A RETINA SPECIALIST AT WILLS EYE HOSPITAL, PLEASE CALL US AT 215-928-3444 OR FILL OUT OUR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT FORM.